Caroline Lee

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  • in reply to: Postal route between Russia and France during WWI #31499
    Caroline Lee
    Keymaster

    RESPONSE FROM ARNE NIEDERHUT BSRP FACEBOOK PAGE

    It took some time before the new postal routes were established according to the borders still open for the mail from Russia. Exit was through the “semi-open” Finnish-Swedish border. From there mail went by rail and ship to Denmark and further to France by neutral shipping, either direct or via England.

     

    I own a small group of letters, that shows that even communication between Prussia and Russia was still possible in important matters of noble families. A young German countes was cut off from home by the breakout of the war. She was visiting a Lithuanian Grand Duke, who was a close friend of her family. Not only was she spared from civil internment camp, she also was able to send messages to her aunt in Germany via the daughter of the Grand Duke, who was married to a nobleman, who was working at the Russian Embasy at The Hague. In Spring 1915, she was able to go home by crossing the Finnish-Swedish border and through Denmark.

    in reply to: Postal route between Russia and France during WWI #31496
    Caroline Lee
    Keymaster

    RESPONSE FROM MICHAEL KISS BSRP FACEBOOK PAGE

    The link provided has all of the copies of the The Philatest, the Journal published by the France & Colonies Philatelic Society.  The Journals go back to 1943 and are all downloadable.  Perhaps some one in the past 75 years has published a relevant article.  Sorry couldn’t be of more assistance.  https://www.franceandcolonies.org/philatelist.php

    • This reply was modified 8 months, 1 week ago by Caroline Lee.
    in reply to: Postal route between Russia and France during WWI #31494
    Caroline Lee
    Keymaster

    TESPONSE FROM MICHAEL KISS BSRP FACEBOOK PAGE

    The link provided has all of the copies of the The Philatest, the Journal published by the France & Colonies Philatelic Society.  The Journals go back to 1943 and are all downloadable.  Perhaps some one in the past 75 years has published a relevant article.  Sorry couldn’t be of more assistance.  https://www.franceandcolonies.org/philatelist.php

    in reply to: FIRST ZOOM MEETING – DETAILS #31389
    Caroline Lee
    Keymaster

    Presenters – please be aware of Zoom’s terms of service, particulalry with regard to copyright material https://zoom.us/terms

    in reply to: FIRST ZOOM MEETING – DETAILS #31377
    Caroline Lee
    Keymaster
    A BIT ABOUT OUR PRESENTERS…
    Ivo Steijn – Postmarks of the Crimea and some postal history. Ivo works as a director for a bank in California and lives in Los Angeles. His collecting interests include Crimean postmarks, Siberian postal history of the Civil War period, and various post-Soviet states like Azerbaijan, Ukraine and Turkmenistan. He has been a BSRP member since the late 19th century (only a slight exaggeration!) and has fond memories of the meetings at the Union Jack Club, back when he still lived in the Netherlands.
    Howard Weinert – Sakhalin. Howard is Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. He has been a member of BSRP for 50 years and counting (recruited by John Lloyd). He collects covers in the following areas: Russia’s Pacific coast (Sakhalin, Kamchatka, Vladivostok, etc.), American and British intervention in the Russian Civil War, American diplomats and travelers in Russia, WW2 Arctic convoys, and Romanov family mail.
    Neil Ritchie – WW1 censor marks of Vladivostok and surrounding area 1914-1920. I’m a retired Architect living in Sheffield UK. My collecting interests include WW1 Russian and Finnish censorship marks, Allied Intervention into Russia, WW2 Pictorial Soviet Fieldpost stationery, Latvian Ruble period 1918-1922, Poland (mainly 1944-45 plus a few other periods).
    In addition, I have put together a collection of WW1 Canadian Military 1914-1919 from mobilization, the first contingent, the western front, Canadian military railways in France and finishing with their part in the Allied Intervention into Russia. I own an undeveloped collection of the Spanish Civil War and I am the editor of the Spanish Study Circle magazine “Espana”, in spite of knowing very little about Spanish Philately, but it’s a quick way to learn.
    I was introduced about ten years ago to the BSRP by Edward Kempla and managed to attend some of the pre-Covid London meetings .
    MEETING 14 MARCH AT 7.30PM (GMT)
    1. Address and welcome by Neil Ritchie, President BSRP
    2. Ivo Steijn – Postmarks of the Crimea and some postal history
    3. Howard Weinert – Sakhalin
    4. Neil Ritchie – WW1 censor marks of Vladivostok and surrounding area 1914-1920
    Caroline Lee
    Keymaster

    Dear Ms Lee resp. Mr Lechtanski,
    thank you very much for contacting me in your attempt to help me localize the place of Brusk in Russia, which may have been misspelled in the Mars edition.
    I have found Biysk on a map of Russia, the city which you suggest might be the one that August Piedmont, a brother of my grandfather who was a POW in Siberia
    mentions in his report.
    Unfortunately I do not believe that this is the place that he means because the context of the other places mentioned in connection with ‘Brusk’ do not make it appear likely that he was referring to Biysk.
    Let me explain my view by translating the sentence in which he mentions ‘Brusk’:
    -> ‘After a two-week sojourn in Jekaterinburg, where the 23 of us were accomodated in a basement room, the journey continued rather fast via Brusk, Tomsk to Krasnojarsk to the local officers’ camp, where we met 3000 officers, amongst them about 250 Germans.’

    Travelling to Biysk from Jekaterinburg and from Biysk to Tomsk would have been a tremendous detour so that I do not regard it as very likely that they made the journey there.
    Nevertheless thank you for taking an interest in the problem that I have hitherto not been able to solve.
    If another idea of how to solve the riddle should occur to you, do not hesitate to contact me.
    Yours sincerely,
    Dr Max Herresthal

    in reply to: Russian Philately on Facebook #25835
    Caroline Lee
    Keymaster
    Caroline Lee
    Keymaster

    Thanks for response – I have forwarded on to enquirer.

    Caroline Lee
    Keymaster

    Thanks Ron, I have forwarded information to enquirer.

    in reply to: Frequency of Journal #25718
    Caroline Lee
    Keymaster

    Besides having enough material it is also a matter of cost.  Our journal costs approximately £12 to produce and then there is postage and packaging on top of that.  The subscription fee of £25 per annum would not cover two journals a year.

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